The long-awaited documentary on former Rolling Stones bassist Bill Wyman will be among the rock docs premiering at New York's Tribeca Film Festival, which runs from from April 24th to May 5th. According to director Ollie Murray's website (OllieMurray.com), “The Quiet One provides a behind-the-scenes look at the highs and lows of the life and career of Bill Wyman, former founding member of the Rolling Stones and renaissance man of rock and roll. Using Bill's personal archive and including interviews with Bill’s family, band-mates and friends, the film provides a fresh insight into the reality behind the myths and legends of music’s rock and roll years as we explore the experiences and stories of an amusing, engaging and down-to-earth man; often simply called 'The Quiet One.' The movie is currently in post-production.

Best Classic Bands reported that the film festival will also premiere new docs on late-INXS frontman Michael Hutchence (Mystify: Michael Hutchence), Linda Ronstadt (Linda Ronstadt: The Sound Of My Voice), and the 1969 Woodstock festival (Woodstock: Three Days That Defined A Generation).

Bill Wyman, who is now 82, retired from the Stones in 1991 and recently successfully battled back against prostate cancer. Although Wyman is no longer a partner in the Stones franchise, he is considered the band's primary in-house historian and still contributes to their archival projects.

Wyman explained in the 2010 Stones In Exile DVD that although 1972's Exile On Main Street proved to be among the greatest of the Stones' '70s albums, the sessions were far from being the most productive or professional of the era: “I suppose we had the band there — the whole band there — probably 30 percent, 40 percent of the time. The rest of the time it was just bits. Me and Charlie (Watts) and Mick didn't come — Mick Taylor didn't come — and me Charlie and Keith (Richards), so we'd work on something. 'Next day Keith wouldn't come because Mick (Jagger) wasn't there, so then Mick'd come and he'd see that Keith wasn't there and the next day he wouldn't come. And sometimes we'd all get there to a session and Keith wouldn't even come! He was upstairs sleeping! Charlie'd come five hours, y'know, me and Mick Taylor had come two hours, Mick had come an hour and Keith is upstairs, and he didn't come down to the session! And it was like, madness.”