Bob Dylan and Martin Scorsese are teaming up once again to chronicle one of Dylan's most important periods. Variety reported that Netflix will release the new film, titled Rolling Thunder Revue: A Bob Dylan Story By Martin Scorsese. Scorsese famously directed the 2005 No Direction Home: Bob Dylan doc, which chronicled Dylan's early life through his 1966 motorcycle crash.

Netflix described the upcoming film by saying, "Rolling Thunder Revue: A Bob Dylan Story By Martin Scorsese captures the troubled spirit of America in 1975 and the joyous music that Dylan performed during the fall of that year. Part documentary, part concert film, part fever dream, Rolling Thunder is a one of a kind experience, from master filmmaker Martin Scorsese." According to source, a premiere date announcement is, quote, "months away."

The fall 1975 Rolling Thunder Tour ran from October 30th to December 8th. Among the performers who were mainstays of the tour were Joan Baez, Roger McGuinn, Bob Neuwirth, T Bone Burnett, Ramblin’ Jack Elliott, Ronee Blakley, Mick Ronson, Scarlet Rivera, Allen Ginsberg, and Sam Shepard. Along the way, special guests appearing on stage, in the studio or behind the scenes were Joni Mitchell, Ringo Starr, Patti Smith, Bette Midler, Kinky Friedman, Dennis Hopper, and Phil Ochs, among others.

Back in 2011, New York City's Morrison Hotel Gallery in SoHo hosted Ken Regan Presents Bob Dylan. The show, which was produced in honor of Dylan's 70th, featured Ken Regan's classic and iconic shots from Dylan's historic fall 1975 Rolling Thunder Revue tour. Shortly before his death in 2012, Regan told us that prior to the tour, it was inconceivable for Dylan to allow any photographer such unprecedented and unlimited access: ["He just came out of his shell. It was like, the equivalent of Howard Hughes — who nobody had seen or talked to in 20 years — suddenly saying, 'Okay, I want you to document everything that I'm doing for the next 70 days.' And I did! I shot 13,475 images."] SOUNDCUE (:15 OC: . . . shot 13,475 images)

Regan said that even though Dylan was more accessible than he had ever been before in his career — he did demand a modicum of privacy: ["He said, 'There are a couple of reservations that I have. My wife and kids are gonna be on the tour. You can photograph them as much as you want — never, ever release them.'"] SOUNDCUE (:08 OC: . . . ever release them)